Congress for Kids Print this Page
  Search


Quizzes Independence Constitution Legislative Branch Executive Branch Judicial Branch Elections Citizenship
  Judicial Branch

Introduction Supreme Court The Justices Dealing with Segregation

 


Books & Reading

Books & Reading





Supreme Court The Justices Dealing with Segregation
Dealing with Segregation

Thousands of lawyers from all over the country go to the Supreme Court every year hoping to plead their cases. The Supreme Court rules only on the most important cases. Often these cases are those that concern basic freedoms and civil rights protected by the Bill of Rights.

Sometimes the Supreme Court is asked to make a decision so important that the whole country pays careful attention to its ruling. Racial segregation (the separation of black and white people) in public schools was ruled unconstitutional by the Supreme Court in 1954. The Court’s unanimous opinion outlawing this kind of separation in public schools was written by Chief Justice Earl Warren. Schools all over the United States were affected by this decision. This decision also paved the way for new civil rights laws passed in the years that followed.

Show What You Know

 


A court decision banning segregation was made as early as 1855? Also, many blacks settled in Kansas after the Civil War to escape the Jim Crow laws and continuing acts of violence against them in southern states. Kansas offered much less racial prejudice. In fact, majority opinion favored the education of blacks.

Surf with Uncle Sam
Surf with Uncle Sam


Word Spy
Word Spy


Projects You Can Do

The Dirksen Congressional CenterCopyright 2008