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Introduction The President President's Job, Part I President's Job, Part II President's Cabinet President and Congress Impeachment President Has Fun

 




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The Presidential Timeline of the Twentieth Century


Impeachment President and Congress The President President's Job, Part I President's Job, Part II President's Cabinet President Has Fun

The President's Job, Part I

The writers of the Constitution intended for Congress to be the most powerful branch of government. In recent times, however, the president has become nearly as powerful. Although he is the single most important figure in our government, he must still have congressional approval for many of his actions.

At the beginning of each session of Congress, the president must report on the State of the Union. The president gives his opinion, in this important speech, of how the country is doing and presents his ideas about what needs to be done in the coming year. The work of government moves along smoothly when the president and Congress cooperate. Otherwise, very little can be accomplished -- this is called "gridlock."

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President Harry S. Truman revealed that the United States had a hydrogen bomb in his last State of the Union speech.

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