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Introduction Election Day Voting Election of the President Candidates Political Parties Primary Election National Conventions National Conventions - An Inside View Candidates at the Convention The Campaign Polling Places The Electoral College The Electoral Map The Inauguration

 




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Primary Election Political Parties Election Day Voting Election of the President Candidates National Conventions National Conventions - An Inside View Candidates at the Convention The Campaign Polling Places The Electoral College The Electoral Map The Inauguration

Candidates at the Convention

Candidates didn’t go to nominating conventions before 1932. Franklin Delano Roosevelt flew to Chicago in that year to accept the Democratic nomination in person. It has been part of the American political tradition since then for the candidate to make a personal appearance at the convention.

A presidential candidate is chosen near the close of the convention. A great deal of thought to selecting a running mate is given by the candidate for President and the party leaders. The party usually wants to have a “balanced ticket.” This means the party wants two candidates who come from different backgrounds.

Once candidate may be from the East, the other from the West or South. One candidate may have been a Governor, the other a Senator. One candidate may come from a poor family, the other from a wealthy family. Candidates may practice different religions. A political party hopes to appeal to more voters by selecting candidates who differ in some way.

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The first national convention of the Democratic Party began in Baltimore on May 21, 1832. In that year the infamous 2/3 rule was created, requiring a 2/3 majority to nominate a candidate, in order to show the party's unanimous support of Martin Van Buren for vice president.

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