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Introduction Election Day Voting Election of the President Candidates Political Parties Primary Election National Conventions National Conventions - An Inside View Candidates at the Convention The Campaign Polling Places The Electoral College The Electoral Map The Inauguration

 




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Primary Election Political Parties Election Day Voting Election of the President Candidates National Conventions National Conventions - An Inside View Candidates at the Convention The Campaign Polling Places The Electoral College The Electoral Map The Inauguration

Candidates

Candidates for public office want to make sure that voters know about them and are familiar with their ideas. Presidential candidates try to travel to all fifty states. Some candidates for other offices may campaign only in their own states or cities.

Candidates want everyone to recognize their names and faces. Some are already well-known to the American public, for example, Bill Bradley of New Jersey was a basketball star and John Glenn of Ohio was an astronaut before they became senators. Ronald Reagan was a movie actor before serving as governor of California and later as president of the United States.

Candidates do quite a lot to gain popularity – shake hands, greet people, and give speeches. They appear on television and radio shows, run ads in newspapers, and argue with other candidates during televised debates. Presidential candidates want the voters to know what they stand for, their ideas on important issues and problems. They talk about what they will do if they win the race for president.

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The largest number of women to file as candidates for U.S. Senate elections was 29 (22D, 7R), which occurred in 1992. The largest number of women to win major-party nominations for the U.S. Senate was 11, which occurred in 1992 (10D, 1R) and again in 2002 (8D, 3R).

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Vote: If you've done this right, then hopefully you won't make the wrong choice. By following the steps and being true to yourself you can be sure you've done your best to choose the candidate that's most suitable to represent you. So vote!

The Dirksen Congressional CenterCopyright 2008